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2013 Citizen-based Monitoring Awards

Ozaukee Fish Passage Program
Citizen-based Monitoring Program of the Year

Andrew Struck
Andrew Struck, Ozaukee County Planning and Parks Dept. Director accepted the awards for the Fish Passage Program and Rick Frye.
Since 2006, the Ozaukee County Planning & Parks Department has procured nearly $8 million in federal, state, local, and other funding to develop, refine, and implement the Ozaukee Fish Passage Program. Together, the department, municipalities, consultants, conservation corps, non-profit organizations, and volunteers have removed approximately 180 fish passage impediments in Ozaukee County, restored habitat and access to habitats, and monitored the environmental response of their projects reconnecting migratory Lake Michigan and Milwaukee Estuary fish populations previously removed from over 100 miles of stream and thousands of acres of wetland habitats. During 2011 and 2012, the Ozaukee Fish Passage Program and its consultants recruited 21 volunteers to collect species occurrence data across Ozaukee County to provide information for GIS Tool refinement and validation. These data will bolster ongoing GIS Tool efforts which will ultimately assist other regional, state, and local planning decision makers to evaluate riparian/aquatic habitat conservation initiatives economically and quickly, providing transferable knowledge throughout the Great Lakes Basin. This collective effort and the knowledge gained would not have been possible through the WDNR’s existing fish management program.

The Wisconsin Citizen-Based Monitoring Network and Department of Natural Resources would like to recognize and thank The Ozaukee Fish Passage Program and all the staff and volunteers who have contributed so much to resource monitoring in Wisconsin.


Rick Frye
Outstanding Achievement in Citizen-based Monitoring
Rick Frye
Rick Frye electrofishing
Rick has taken on a leadership role within the Ozaukee County Fish Passage Program’s fish surveys and has gone above and beyond to exceed expectations as a Program volunteer. Rick is the most frequent survey attendee and has volunteered almost 30 hours of his time at five electrofishing survey events. Rick shares his passion for the environment with his commitment to developing positive relationships with fellow volunteers and by providing a leadership role during each event, helping to guide new volunteers into the labor intensive process. Rick has further demonstrated his commitment to citizen based monitoring, environmental stewardship, and the Program’s efforts by bringing his grandchildren to observe an electrofishing survey that he was unable to participate in. In addition to his work with the Ozaukee Fish Passage Program, Rick also volunteers for the Southeast Wisconsin Chapter of Trout Unlimited.


Robin Squier
Outstanding Achievement in Citizen-based Monitoring

Robin Squier
Robin has been an active volunteer with the Urban Ecology Center for nearly 7 years and has been dedicated to the Center’s bird banding project since 2007. As a volunteer she has filled many roles at the Center from citizen science participant to citizen science advisor, volunteering over 150 hours of her time in 2012 alone. She currently serves as the co-chair of the Center’s Institutional and Animal Care Use Committee, ensuring that the Center’s research and monitoring projects treated wildlife in an ethical and humane way. Robin’s biggest accomplishment as a volunteer this year was taking the lead in writing a proposal to make Milwaukee a Bird City. Milwaukee became the biggest Bird City in the state of Wisconsin as a result of her hard-work and dedication. Robin is a retired Milwaukee Public School District teacher and in her free-time she loves to bird and report her findings on eBird.


Dan Jackson
Outstanding Achievement in Citizen-based Monitoring

Dan Jackson
Dan has been an enormously avid and reliable citizen monitor for the Wisconsin Odonata Survey since 2009. He currently serves as vice president of the Wisconsin Dragonfly Society, frequently assists and encourages beginners with identification or ecological questions on the Dragonfly Society Facebook pages, contributes county record, state record and other desirable specimens to the Wisconsin Odonata Collection, donates photographs for use on the Wisconsin Odnoata Survey website and for other educational purposes, and frequently and reliably assists with numerous Odonata research activities. Since 2009 he has contributed an amazing total of 4,051 Odonata records to the Odonata Survey, including a first state record of Tramea calverti. He even collected over 100 specimens of this species and reared dozens in his home.


Ethan Bott
Outstanding Achievement in Youth Monitoring
Ethan Bott
Ethan Bott banding a bird
Ethan has been an active volunteer with the Urban Ecology Center for 5 years, starting at the Center when he was only 12 years old. He has volunteered over 300 hours to help the Urban Ecology Center’s Research and Citizen Science programs, including 225 hours to the bird banding project alone. In addition, he has contributed over 75 hours of time on monarch, snake, and turtle monitoring surveys. He is so well respected and capable that he mentored a college intern to become the primary investigator on the monarch monitoring project. His willingness to support the project leaders and advance his research skills, especially at 5 in the morning for bird banding, has earned Ethan the respect and admiration of and appreciation by other seasoned volunteers. Ethan is a senior at White Fish Bay High School and will be attending the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point in the fall.




Dave Redell
Lifetime Achievement in Citizen-based Monitoring

Dave Redell Dave Redell and Eastern Pipistrelle
Dave Redell devoted his life to the study and conservation of bats; an intriguing and valuable, though often misunderstood group of animals now facing multiple threats. In 2004, Dave became the first bat ecologist for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in the Bureau of Endangered Resources. In addition to building the DNR’s Wisconsin Bat Conservation Program, Dave worked to enact vanguard regulations to protect Wisconsin bats and developed a plan that will guide the state’s response to white-nose syndrome, a disease devastating hibernating bat populations in North America. Thanks to his efforts and the entire DNR “bat crew”, the acoustic and roost monitoring projects of the Wisconsin Bat Monitoring Program has now grown to almost 500 volunteers. The amount and quality of the data collected by the bat program volunteers is vital in order to make sound conservation decisions for Wisconsin’s seven bat species.

Dave Redell
Dave was highly regarded by national, regional, and local partners, served as Vice President of the Midwest Bat Working Group, and recently initiated the first Wisconsin Bat Festivals. In August of 2012, he was honored with the prestigious Silver Eagle Award from the US Fish & Wildlife Service and with a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Midwest Bat Working Group. Dave was grateful for the time and efforts made by the many volunteers of the Wisconsin Bat Program. He had a unique gift for inspiring instant camaraderie with people and those who interacted with him went away with a new appreciation for bats. Dave passed away after a long struggle with brain cancer in 2012.

Because of his dedication to and extraordinary achievements in bat conservation and citizen-based monitoring, The Wisconsin Citizen-based Monitoring Network and Advisory Council have declared that all future CBM lifetime achievement awards will be named the David N. Redell Award for Lifetime Achievement in Citizen-based Monitoring.


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